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Saying goodbye to our senior siblings

Empty Nest Syndrome affects all

Seniors+are+preparing+to+leave+for+college+as+graduation+comes+close.++Graduation+is+on+Saturday%2C+June+10.
Seniors are preparing to leave for college as graduation comes close.  Graduation is on Saturday, June 10.

Seniors are preparing to leave for college as graduation comes close. Graduation is on Saturday, June 10.

Haylie Paulin

Haylie Paulin

Seniors are preparing to leave for college as graduation comes close. Graduation is on Saturday, June 10.

Haylie Paulin, Rooster Reporter

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As graduation comes closer, seniors are frantically preparing for college life. In August, homes across Winston-Salem, Lewisville, and Pfafftown will be one child down. Empty Nest Syndrome, or more commonly known as loneliness, will fill the hole in these homes. Empty Nest Syndrome not only affects the parents; it also affects the siblings.

Whether or not you’re close with your senior siblings, there is definitely a feeling of loss when one leaves for college. At family dinners there is one seat left empty. If you have a question about homework, their room is deserted.

I myself will experience empty nest syndrome this year. My sister, Cassie Paulin, is a senior. We have been very close, same sports teams, same hobbies, even the same class this year when we both decided to take AP Human Geography.

“I’ve already had one of my sisters leave for college,” said sophomore Molly Sytz. “But there is still a weird feeling when they leave. I’ll be the only one in the house next year.”

Modern technology has made this distance more bearable. In about three seconds you can send a text message to a sibling that lives 500 miles away.

“I talk to my sister every day, so it might be a little different when she leaves for college,” said freshman David Nichols, brother to senior Kourtney Nichols. “I plan to continue to talk to her even though she will be attending BYU Idaho.”

If we can call or text any time of day to our siblings, does the distance really matter? Absolutely. Communication technology is no match for seeing your brother or sister in person. Phone calls cannot compare to seeing them face to face.

Next year Cassie will be attending North Carolina State University. Even though she will only be an hour-and-a-half away, I will still miss her. I’m going to miss watching movies on the weekend, burning cookies and playing golf with her.

Cassie and I have almost never been separated. Our mom dressed us alike when we were little and many people think we are twins. One thing I won’t miss when Cassie leaves for college is mistakenly called the wrong name. Empty Nest Syndrome will affect me very soon.

Some families only see their college student for holidays and during the summer.  Although colleges have long holiday breaks, which only happens three times a year, students may either be studying or going back to work for the portion of their stay in town.

During these breaks when your sibling is home, it’s important to take advantage of the time they are home. Don’t just pretend they aren’t there. Cherish the times you spend together as a family and as brother or sister.

As we send our siblings off to college, don’t be sad. Instead, think of the time you have had together and embrace the importance of having each other. Missing one another only reminds us of the memories we have made and the many more we will make as we grow up.

“Going to college will be very different,” said senior Cassidy Hubbard. “I’m used to having my sister around, and I’m going to miss our fun times together.”

Family is forever. Even if you are miles and miles away, you are still brother and sister.Empty nest syndrome can’t be avoidable, but it won’t last forever as long as you keep in touch with your brother or sister in college. Make the time last while you still have them in the house. Preserve the memories that will forever hold a place in your heart as we say goodbye to our senior siblings.

 

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